Camp NaNoWriMo 2017

Hello everyone!

I just wanted to pop in here real quick and let you all know I’m doing Camp NaNoWriMo this year! YAY. Are you?????

tenor

*If you want to know why I haven’t been posting the last few weeks about my WIP it’s because nothing is new! There’s no update to be had…except for the fact that I’ve been on a writing spree lately and I don’t want to jinx myself by talking too much about everything…ha. Hope you understand!*

So, anywho back to Camp 😀 …

I’ve done the official NaNoWriMo event in the past (i.e. the one that happens in November), but I have never done it in July (or April for that matter) with Camp. I’m not sure why I’m so much more excited about Camp than I usually am about November, but I am, and I’m just going with it for now.

That being said, I have always been a big NaNo fan because it’s just amazing. I know this through personal experience and because it’s just a fact of life. An entire event dedicated to creating community and helping writers stay motivated to write every day deserves a gold star in my book.

Some people don’t care for NaNoWriMo because they think it encourages poor writing. After all, writing that much every day can almost guarantee you’ll have some days where you are straight up vomiting onto the page, but as we all know, all first drafts are shit so why the hell does this matter?

I do understand the people who don’t do NaNoWriMo (Camp or the actual event in November) because they’re hauling ass all year. Every month is their NaNoWriMo. Fair enough, I understand your point. And in truth, I’ve been there too. But, I still love and utilize the event because it helps me stay on track with my progress no matter how hard I’ve been working all year. It forces me to put all those doubts and worries and blah blah blah and throw them out the window for a solid month and just write.

Luckily for me, I am still writing my book (creating something out of nothing, not fixing what’s already there…sort of). I’m far away from editing and revising. I mean, I’m technically revising right now, but if you’ve been keeping up with me you know that’s a load of crap. I’m writing First Draft Part Two. Something that had me crying with desolation only a few weeks ago but now has me crying with glee this week. Okay, maybe more like crying at how much my fingers have been cramping from typing so much, but there is glee in there.

So yeah. That’s all I really wanted to say for today. Let me know what your thoughts about NaNo are! Are you for it? Against it? Apathetic? LET ME KNOW.

And with that, I’m gonna dash out of here because I’m already missing my draft.

Thanks for reading!

P.S. If you wanted to know, my goal this month is 100,000 words (double the usual for NaNo). I’ll probably end up dying before I get there, but hey, why not aim high. The only thing I have to lose is my sanity or possibly the use of my fingers. I’ll let you know how I end up faring.tenor1

False Starts

Oh heyyyy

So today I wanted to talk a little bit about the absolute struggle of figuring out where you should start your story.

I’ve always struggled with beginnings, no matter if I’m writing a novel, a short story, a poem, an essay (introduction paragraphs are the bane of my existence), or what have you. But I’ve never realized how much of a hurdle they really were for me. I didn’t like them, but I always managed to write them and make it work.

As you know I’ve been *ahem* struggling with revisions. I’ve basically been ripping my hair out for the last two months trying to get this story together. But I didn’t realize that the reason nothing was coming together was because I was starting my story in the wrong place.

I was getting so excited about all the things I had in store that I was skipping over some major plot points and character development that I didn’t even know I needed. All I knew was that something was wrong but I could not figure out what.

Enter post-its and letting things simmer.

I’m not kidding these two things saved my story. (And my hair.)

What I ended up doing was this… I basically threw up every little thought I had about my story onto post-its so I could see everything that had been battling for attention in my head out in the open. And it helped me so much. There wasn’t any pressure to try and fit things together, no stress of filling plot holes or tossing things that didn’t make sense. This was an absolute thought dump.*

A small sampling of the thought dump with the bonus of my super motivational calendar

Then I looked at everything I had written down and I let things simmer. I didn’t ignore my story, but I didn’t try to control it either. I had all my ideas out, I could look at each and every one of them and just absorb them for what they were. Ideas.

After a few days of this, I had an actual idea of where I needed to start my story. I was able to look at all my ideas and see where they needed to happen and what needed to happen before them.

Then. I got to writing.

I made a very basic outline through Scrivener’s corkboard of the events I wanted to happen and I got to work.

And now, I feel amazing. I know what needs to happen but better yet, I know where my story needs to start. And spoiler alert! it wasn’t where I had originally thought. Not at alllllll.

So, that’s all I have for today. Let me know if you have ever struggled with false starts and please feel free to share how you were able to figure them out! (I know I could definitely use more advice!)

Thanks for reading!


*Side note: I’ve done thought dumps before (as I’ve mentioned in past posts) but I’ve always done them in a word document. I’ve realized that I need to see all my thoughts in my writing in a physical form. Not in text on my computer that I need to scroll through. 

Get Over Yourself

Hey everyone!

For this week, since nothing new or exciting is happening in my current WIP (I’m still working on my first rewrite), I thought I’d switch it up a little and focus on a subject every writer faces: criticism and feedback, and really, why it’s so important. (Disclaimer: I’m discussing constructive criticism here. I am not talking about people shitting on your story just for the hell of it.)

This is actually pretty relevant to my life right now since I just (literally like ten minutes ago) submitted a short story for my creative writing workshop. For those of you out there that have taken a creative writing course, you know that submitting drafts to be critiqued can be pretty scary. I’m currently taking my fifth and final CW class at my university, but I still get a little nervous submitting my work, and don’t get me started on actual workshop day. I’m practically a ball of sweat and fear.

But, unpleasant imagery aside, I cannot stress enough how important listening to the feedback you receive on your stories is.

A few months ago I wrote a post for my other blog (Fiction Facts) all about this and for your convenience, I’m pasting it below. Why am I doing this? Well, for one, it’s always fun to share a story about how much of a dunce I used to be, but I think it could also be helpful to any of you out there that do struggle with accepting criticism.

On a whole, getting critiqued is a good thing, and here’s why:

Back in the day, I wrote a short story that I thought was everything. I thought it was the best thing I had ever written and dammit I was proud of it. I was so proud of it that when I submitted it for my freshman year creative writing workshop I was so, so sure that everyone would love it. That nothing could possibly be wrong with it.

Big shocker! I was wrong. My fellow classmates did not think I was God’s gift to the writing community. In fact, they had quite a few major problems with my story.

But, did I listen to their advice? No. I knew my work was excellent. They just didn’t understand my craft (so gross––anyone else hating how pretentious that sounded?). I felt so confident in my work that I submitted it for another creative writing class the following semester.

Untouched. No revisions whatsoever.

And guess what? The people in that class didn’t like it either. But I was so arrogant I still didn’t accept this. I still thought I was a better writer than my peers, that I knew what made a real story.

In case it wasn’t obvious I was a total idiot. And reading this back I sound like a straight up assface (I promise I kept these entitled thoughts to myself, but the fact they were there at all…ohhhhh so embarrassing).

Well, flash forward a few years to about a month ago. There I was, all ready to create another piece for workshop. Before I began writing, I thought it would be fun to go back and look at the story I had written my freshman year.

And oh…oh did that story suck ass. It was so bad! I’m not exaggerating, I physically cringed whilst reading it over. I wanted to go back and slap my eighteen-year-old self across the face for thinking she was a BAMF when it came to writing. Because in just a few short years I had grown so much as a writer––not just in actual skill, but also in humility, in being open to the fact that I don’t know everything.

We’ve been over this, but NOTHING you write is going to be perfect, especially the first time around. And even after you’ve edited and revised to the point of actual pain, chances are it still isn’t going to be perfect.

But. As long as you are open to advice, as long as you are open to change, I promise you, you will become a better writer. Don’t be the arrogant dick I was. Accept the fact that neither you nor your work is a golden god and get over yourself.

Because, and I hate to say it, but if you can’t do this, if you cannot accept the fact that your story is going to need some work, cannot accept the fact that even as its creator you don’t always know what is best for it, then there’s a real possibility the only thing separating you from publication is yourself. Scary, right? Things just got deep. But it’s true.

Now, I’m not encouraging you to sell out or agree to changes that you know aren’t right. Use your gut here, but please do not ignore your head. Really think about the critique given to you. Go into revision with an open mind and you’ll know what suggestions have validity. And you know what? Your story will be better for it.

Don’t be afraid of change. Do be afraid of arrogance.

Well, there’s my little tale with a hearty splash of advice. I hope that this was helpful for some of you. I know how scary getting critiqued can be, and I know (believe me, I know) how much you may want to fight against what other people say, but if you open yourself up enough to listen––not argue or put up the defense––I promise you, you will become a better writer.

Good luck!